Market News
September 22, 2012 @ 11:34 am

Euro Shorts Decrease Further, New Zealand Longs Increase by 65% – COT Report

Data from the CFTC’s latest Commitments of Traders report shows that traders again reduced their bets on a Euro decline versus the dollar. Last week traders had -73,482 contracts net short on the single currency, a fall from the previous week’s -93,658 number. From the date of the last COT report on September 11 to this week’s last day for which data is collected, Tuesday September 18, the Euro gained 193 pips versus the dollar. This data does include the effect of the Fed’s latest easing action, QEX.

The Pound position switched from slightly net short to net long this week. Last week traders had -4,366 contracts betting on a fall in GBP/USD. This week the position is +14,412 contracts net long. In the past week, from Tuesday to Tuesday, Sterling gained +174 pips on the dollar.

Japanese Yen net longs decreased by 17k contracts, falling from last week’s 32,773 to this week’s 15,476 number. Swiss Frank shorts decreased slightly, falling from last week’s -8,967 contracts to this week’s -4,527 contracts. The USD/CHF pair lost 105 pips in that period.

The New Zealand Dollar position had one of the biggest percentage increases in past week, going from +10,032 contracts net long to 16,605 contracts, or around 65% increase. The NZD/USD gained +99 pips in that timeframe. The Australian Dollar position barely changed last week. The Aussie had +68,259 contracts betting on it rising versus the dollar, now that number is up slightly to +69,246 contracts.

The Canadian Dollar, which was making the headlines the past few weeks with its big percentage increases, only saw its net long position gain around 10% this week. On September 11 the Canadian Dollar long position was at +101,860 contracts. This week the position increased to +111,881 contracts net long.

While this is a small increase in percentage terms, its important to note that this week’s 111k and last week’s 100k are the biggest net long positions in the Canadian Dollar in the past 4 years. The previous few times the maximum the net long position reached was around +70k, this happened in March 2010, February and April 2011 and in May 2012. The USD/CAD pair traded almost unchanged in the last Tuesday – Tuesday period, gaining only 13 pips. It didn’t move much after Tuesday either, it gained only 19 pips and closed the week at 0.9760.

Data from the CFTC’s latest Commitments of Traders report shows that traders again reduced their bets on a Euro decline versus the dollar. Last week traders had -73,482 contracts net short on the single currency, a fall from the previous week’s -93,658 number. From the date of the last COT report on September 11 to this week’s last day for which data is collected, Tuesday September 18, the Euro gained 193 pips versus the dollar. This data does include the effect of the Fed’s latest easing action, QEX.

The Pound position switched from slightly net short to net long this week. Last week traders had -4,366 contracts betting on a fall in GBP/USD. This week the position is +14,412 contracts net long. In the past week, from Tuesday to Tuesday, Sterling gained +174 pips on the dollar.

Japanese Yen net longs decreased by 17k contracts, falling from last week’s 32,773 to this week’s 15,476 number. Swiss Frank shorts decreased slightly, falling from last week’s -8,967 contracts to this week’s -4,527 contracts. The USD/CHF pair lost 105 pips in that period.

The New Zealand Dollar position had one of the biggest percentage increases in past week, going from +10,032 contracts net long to 16,605 contracts, or around 65% increase. The NZD/USD gained +99 pips in that timeframe. The Australian Dollar position barely changed last week. The Aussie had +68,259 contracts betting on it rising versus the dollar, now that number is up slightly to +69,246 contracts.

The Canadian Dollar, which was making the headlines the past few weeks with its big percentage increases, only saw its net long position gain around 10% this week. On September 11 the Canadian Dollar long position was at +101,860 contracts. This week the position increased to +111,881 contracts net long.

While this is a small increase in percentage terms, its important to note that this week’s 111k and last week’s 100k are the biggest net long positions in the Canadian Dollar in the past 4 years. The previous few times the maximum the net long position reached was around +70k, this happened in March 2010, February and April 2011 and in May 2012. The USD/CAD pair traded almost unchanged in the last Tuesday – Tuesday period, gaining only 13 pips. It didn’t move much after Tuesday either, it gained only 19 pips and closed the week at 0.9760.

Data from the CFTC’s latest Commitments of Traders report shows that traders again reduced their bets on a Euro decline versus the dollar. Last week traders had -73,482 contracts net short on the single currency, a fall from the previous week’s -93,658 number. From the date of the last COT report on September 11 to this week’s last day for which data is collected, Tuesday September 18, the Euro gained 193 pips versus the dollar. This data does include the effect of the Fed’s latest easing action, QEX.

The Pound position switched from slightly net short to net long this week. Last week traders had -4,366 contracts betting on a fall in GBP/USD. This week the position is +14,412 contracts net long. In the past week, from Tuesday to Tuesday, Sterling gained +174 pips on the dollar.

Japanese Yen net longs decreased by 17k contracts, falling from last week’s 32,773 to this week’s 15,476 number. Swiss Frank shorts decreased slightly, falling from last week’s -8,967 contracts to this week’s -4,527 contracts. The USD/CHF pair lost 105 pips in that period.

The New Zealand Dollar position had one of the biggest percentage increases in past week, going from +10,032 contracts net long to 16,605 contracts, or around 65% increase. The NZD/USD gained +99 pips in that timeframe. The Australian Dollar position barely changed last week. The Aussie had +68,259 contracts betting on it rising versus the dollar, now that number is up slightly to +69,246 contracts.

The Canadian Dollar, which was making the headlines the past few weeks with its big percentage increases, only saw its net long position gain around 10% this week. On September 11 the Canadian Dollar long position was at +101,860 contracts. This week the position increased to +111,881 contracts net long.

While this is a small increase in percentage terms, its important to note that this week’s 111k and last week’s 100k are the biggest net long positions in the Canadian Dollar in the past 4 years. The previous few times the maximum the net long position reached was around +70k, this happened in March 2010, February and April 2011 and in May 2012. The USD/CAD pair traded almost unchanged in the last Tuesday – Tuesday period, gaining only 13 pips. It didn’t move much after Tuesday either, it gained only 19 pips and closed the week at 0.9760.

Data from the CFTC’s latest Commitments of Traders report shows that traders again reduced their bets on a Euro decline versus the dollar. Last week traders had -73,482 contracts net short on the single currency, a fall from the previous week’s -93,658 number. From the date of the last COT report on September 11 to this week’s last day for which data is collected, Tuesday September 18, the Euro gained 193 pips versus the dollar. This data does include the effect of the Fed’s latest easing action, QEX.

The Pound position switched from slightly net short to net long this week. Last week traders had -4,366 contracts betting on a fall in GBP/USD. This week the position is +14,412 contracts net long. In the past week, from Tuesday to Tuesday, Sterling gained +174 pips on the dollar.

Japanese Yen net longs decreased by 17k contracts, falling from last week’s 32,773 to this week’s 15,476 number. Swiss Frank shorts decreased slightly, falling from last week’s -8,967 contracts to this week’s -4,527 contracts. The USD/CHF pair lost 105 pips in that period.

The New Zealand Dollar position had one of the biggest percentage increases in past week, going from +10,032 contracts net long to 16,605 contracts, or around 65% increase. The NZD/USD gained +99 pips in that timeframe. The Australian Dollar position barely changed last week. The Aussie had +68,259 contracts betting on it rising versus the dollar, now that number is up slightly to +69,246 contracts.

The Canadian Dollar, which was making the headlines the past few weeks with its big percentage increases, only saw its net long position gain around 10% this week. On September 11 the Canadian Dollar long position was at +101,860 contracts. This week the position increased to +111,881 contracts net long.

While this is a small increase in percentage terms, its important to note that this week’s 111k and last week’s 100k are the biggest net long positions in the Canadian Dollar in the past 4 years. The previous few times the maximum the net long position reached was around +70k, this happened in March 2010, February and April 2011 and in May 2012. The USD/CAD pair traded almost unchanged in the last Tuesday – Tuesday period, gaining only 13 pips. It didn’t move much after Tuesday either, it gained only 19 pips and closed the week at 0.9760.

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About Fx_Livermore

Fx_Livermore has over seven years experience in forex trading. He uses a mix of technical and fundamental analysis in his trading. His posts should not be taken as trading advice/recommendation to buy/sell any currency/security.

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3 Responses to “Euro Shorts Decrease Further, New Zealand Longs Increase by 65% – COT Report”


  1. Chelle Says:

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  2. Oscar Says:

    trading is like a university edtacuion, it requires on the order of 10 to 20 years to become proficient and you have to be ready to accept it as a full time career. With that said, the broker that I use is oanda. I use this broker mainly because it allows smaller lot sizes which allows me to be very flexible with my exposure.My recommendation- do not trade with less than 50k account. Do not trade live until you have risk capital (money that you will not need or regret losing) or minimum few years on paper accounts. research is a huge topic. Do not fall for technical analysis, it works in some situations, but the best bet would be to read the prices correctly via price patterns and timing. Do not trade during non farm payrolls or during tokyo and NY lunch hour. Trade during the overlap of US UK sessions for best liquidity. Watch for inflation levels, what central bankers say (and if what they are saying is just a warning or if they are serious about it).For example you would want to monitor the japanese central bank decisions right now because their currency is strong enough to make their bank sell it to lower the price to keep exports competitive. For CAD, watch for gold prices (oil is their major export). ect.FINALLY: the only way to make money in safely is with law of large numbers in terms of capitalization. You have to have an account upwards of 50 mil, so this is not a get rich quick thing. The real money lies in market making and dealing.


  3. Sebastian Says:

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